Carrie M. Lee

Staff Scientist (former)


Seattle, WA
carrie.lee@sei-us.org
skype: carrielee123
+1 (206) 547-4000 x2#

Carrie worked in the Climate and Energy program at the Seattle office of SEI's US center until mid-2016. Her research focused on forest and agricultural climate mitigation strategies, carbon offsets, bioenergy production, ecosystem ecology and management, and regional climate change impacts assessment. She served as an advisor to the Western Climate Initiative's Offset Committee and was a lead author of SEI's Handbook of Carbon Offset Programs, Trading Systems, Funds, Protocols and Standards.

Carrie received her M.S. in Forest Resources and Interdisciplinary Policy Dimensions of Earth Science from the University of Washington in 2007 and was honored with fellowships from the Program on Climate Change and the Program on the Environment. Her master's thesis evaluated the forest stand and Washington State level feasibility of methanol production from woody biomass. She received a B.A. in biology from Carleton College in 2001.


Recent Publications by Carrie M. Lee

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Supply and sustainability of carbon offsets and alternative fuels for international aviation

SEI Working Paper No. 2016-03

Author(s): Bailis, R. ; Broekhoff, D. ; Lee, C.M.
Year: 2016

Research Area(s): Emissions Trading & Offsets

Description:

This paper examines the potential supply of carbon offsets and jet fuel alternatives available to help meet the international aviation sector’s emission reduction needs in 2020–2035. The analysis shows that ICAO can apply high environmental and sustainable-development standards to both carbon offsets and alternative fuels without compromising its 2020 "carbon neutral" goal.


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What cities do best: Piecing together an efficient global climate governance

SEI Working Paper No. 2015-15

Author(s): Broekhoff, D. ; Erickson, P. ; Lee, C.M.
Year: 2015

Research Area(s): Climate Mitigation Policy

Description: This working paper examines the ideal role of city governments under a vertically integrated climate governance system designed to maximize urban mitigation potential. Action by city governments is essential for achieving deep reductions in global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. While many cities are already engaged in pioneering efforts to achieve such reductions, greater support from national governments could help realize urban mitigation potential more fully, quickly, and cost effectively. With greater policy coordination, cities could focus on roles and actions for which they are highly capable and best positioned.
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What cities do best: How to maximize the role of cities in a low-carbon future

SEI and Bloomberg Philanthropies briefing note

Author(s): Broekhoff, D. ; Erickson, P. ; Lee, C.M.
Year: 2015

Research Area(s): Climate Mitigation Policy

Description: This briefing note summarizes an SEI analysis of the GHG abatement potential in cities in a "vertically integrated" system involving close collaboration with higher levels of government. Action by city governments is essential for achieving deep reductions in global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Previous research has shown that cities – using policy levers already at their disposal – could reduce annual GHG emissions by up to 3.7 gigatonnes (Gt) CO2e in 2030, and up to 8 Gt CO2e in 2050. Many cities are already engaged in pioneering efforts to achieve these reductions. Greater support from national governments could help realize this potential more fully, quickly, and cost effectively.
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Options and Issues for Restricted Linking of Emissions Trading Systems

Produced for the International Carbon Action Partnership (ICAP) Technical Dialogue on linking emissions trading systems

Author(s): Lazarus, M. ; Schneider, L. ; Lee, C.M. ; van Asselt, H.
Year: 2015

Research Area(s): Climate Mitigation Policy

Description: This paper examines options that jurisdictions could pursue to capture some of the benefits of linking emissions trading systems (ETSs), short of full linking. Linking ETSs offers many potential benefits, including economic benefits, political benefits, and administrative and institutional benefits. Linking may ultimately be necessary for an ETS to achieve its economic and political objectives, especially for smaller systems. As the limited number of existing links attests, however, linking faces many challenges. This paper thus examines alternatives to full linking, focusing in particular on the potential advantages and drawbacks of "restricted linking": options that enable the flow of units among jurisdictions, but with specific constraints such as quantity limits ("quotas"), or conditions such as exchange rates, to help address concerns that full harmonization might create.
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Can carbon revenues help transform household energy markets?

SEI policy brief

Author(s): Lambe, F. ; Lee, C.M. ; Jürisoo, M.; Johnson, O.
Year: 2014

Research Area(s): Emissions Trading & Offsets ; Climate Mitigation Policy

Description: Carbon finance is emerging as an attractive option to help scale-up cookstove projects, but little research has been done on how well it meets these projects needs. This brief, based on SEI Project Report 2014-01, describes the findings of a scoping study in India and Kenya. Among the key findings is that the affordability of stoves is a major concern for most project developers. Some projects use microfinance, bulk discounts and other mechanisms to help households buy stoves, but high-end price subsidies are the most common approach. The study also found that many project developers, especially smaller businesses and NGOs, also face financial barriers, including lack of access to credit for working capital, low profit margins, and high upfront capital costs. A majority of the carbon-financed project developers interviewed were relying solely on carbon revenues to cover project costs.
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