Jack Sieber

Senior Scientist, Deputy Center Director


Somerville, MA
jack.sieber@sei-us.org
skype: jacksieber
+1 (617) 627-3786 x4#

Jack Sieber is a Senior Scientist at SEI, developing computer-based tools to assist in long-range scenario planning, and working with researchers, policy makers and other stakeholders to help build a path to a sustainable future. Currently, his work focuses on integrated water resources planning at the watershed scale, with a special focus on the potential impacts of climate change. He is the developer of WEAP, the Water Evaluation And Planning system. Jack received an M.S. in Computer Science from Yale University in 1988.


Recent Publications by Jack Sieber

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A water resources model to explore the implications of energy alternatives in the southwestern U.S.

Environmental Research Letters 8(4), 045004

Author(s): Yates, D. ; Flores, F. ; Sieber, J. ; Young, C. ; Averyt, K.; Meldrum, J.; Sattler, S.
Year: 2013

Research Area(s): Water Resources

Description: This article documents the development and validation of a climate-driven, southwestern-U.S.-wide water resources planning model that is being used to explore the implications of extended drought and climate warming on the allocation of water among competing uses. These model uses include a separate accounting for irrigated agriculture; municipal indoor use based on local population and per capita consumption; climate-driven municipal outdoor turf and amenity watering; and thermoelectric cooling. The model simulates the natural and managed flows of rivers throughout the southwest, including the South Platte, the Arkansas, the Colorado, the Green, the Salt, the Sacramento, the San Joaquin, the Owens, and more than 50 others.
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Using economic and other performance measures to evaluate a municipal drought plan

Water Policy, in press, published online July 2013

Author(s): Yates, D. ; Purkey, D. ; Sieber, J. ; Vasquez Lavin, F.; Guerrero, S.; Hanemann, M.
Year: 2013

Research Area(s): Water Resources

Description: This paper explores the welfare costs associated with drought plan transactions between a public municipal water agency, the El Dorado Irrigation District (EID) in California USA and its customers. The EID imposes a tiered pricing plan for municipal customers, which was analyzed as a discrete continuous choice (DCC) model by water users within a climate driven water evaluation and planning (WEAP) model of the EID water system. The DCC is subsequently used to estimate the compensating variation (CV) measure of the loss of consumer welfare in the case where a customer does not receive water that matches a preferred level of demand.
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Simulating High Elevation Hydropower with Regional Climate Warming in the West Slope Sierra Nevada

Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management, online first

Author(s): Rheinheimer, D. ; Sieber, J. ; Mehta, V. ; Viers, J. ; Kiparshy, M.; Ligare, S.
Year: 2013

Research Area(s): Water Resources

Description: This article describes the development of a water resources management model for the upper west slope Sierra Nevada to understand the potential effects of regional climate warming on hydropower at the watershed scale, and the results of that model. Water systems in snowmelt-dominated hydro-regions such as California's Sierra Nevada mountains are sensitive to regional climate change, hydropower systems in particular. The authors developed a water resources management model for the upper west slope Sierra Nevada to understand the potential effects of regional climate warming on hydropower at the watershed scale. The model was developed with the Water Evaluation And Planning system (WEAP) and includes most water management infrastructure in the study region. The study found that the highly productive northern Sierra Nevada would see large reductions in hydropower generation due to decreases in annual runoff related to climate change.
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Climate Driven Water Resources Model of the Sacramento Basin, California

Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management 135:5, 303-313

Author(s): Yates, D. ; Purkey, D. ; Sieber, J. ; Young, C. ; Joyce, B. ; Huber-Lee, A.; Galbraith, H.; West, J. Herrod-Julius, S.; Rayej, M.
Year: 2009

Research Area(s): Water Resources

Description: An integrated modeling framework for addressing water resource planning and management issues in the Sacramento Basin, USA based on the Water Evaluation and Planning model Version 21 (WEAP21). WEAP21 provides a seamless integration of both the physical hydrology of the region and the water management infrastructure that governs the allocation of available water supplies to meet the range of different water demands.
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Climate Warming, Water Storage, and Chinook Salmon In California's Sacramento Valley

In Climatic Change, Vol.91, Issues 3-4

Author(s): Yates, D. ; Purkey, D. ; Sieber, J. ; Joyce, B. ; Galbraith, H.;Huber-Lee, A.;West, J.; Herrod-Julius, S.
Year: 2008

Research Area(s): Water Resources

Description: The Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawns and rears in the cold, freshwater rivers and tributaries of California's Central Valley, with four separate seasonal runs including fall and late-fall runs, a winter run, and a spring run. Dams and reservoirs have blocked access to most of the Chinook's ancestral spawning areas in the upper reaches and tributaries. Consequently, the fish rely on the main stem of the Sacramento River for spawning habitat. Future climatic warming could lead to alterations of the river's temperature regime, which could further reduce the already fragmented Chinook habitat.
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