Ramón Bueno

Staff Scientist (former)


Somerville, MA
ramon.bueno@sei-us.org
skype: bueno.ramon

Ramón was a computer modeler and data analyst, working primarily on energy and climate change mitigation modeling, until March 2013.

He has over 20 years' professional experience designing, building and using analysis models and information systems across a variety of multi-disciplinary applications, including business intelligence and decision support systems.

Prior to joining the SEI energy modeling team, he worked with the Climate Economics Group, which was dissolved in September 2012. There, his recent projects focused on two new models: CRED (Climate and the Regional Economics of Development), works on research and policy analysis in the Climate Economics program at SEI-US.

Ramón is fluent in both Spanish and English and has long been a close observer of, and sometimes participant in, developments in US-Cuba relations, Puerto Rico, and more broadly the Caribbean and Latin America.

He attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he received a B.S. in Aeronautics and Astronautics in 1974 and an M.S. in February 1977 on Systems Modeling and Optimization (Laboratory for Information & Decision Systems-LIDS). In 2007, he completed a one-year mid-career program at MIT in which he focused on socioeconomic development and policy/impact analysis.


Recent Publications by Ramón Bueno

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Climate policy and development: an economic analysis

E3 Network working paper

Author(s): Ackerman, F. ; Stanton, E.A. ; Bueno, R.
Year: 2012

Research Area(s): Climate Economics

Description: This article describes the use of the Climate and Regional Economics of Development (CRED) model to explore the interconnections between climate and development policy. CRED scenarios, based on high and low projections of climate damages, and high and low discount rates, are used to analyze the effects of varying levels of assistance to the poorest regions of the world. The authors find that climate and development choices are nearly independent of each other if the climate threat is seen as either very mild or very serious. The optimal climate policy is to do very little in the former case, and a lot in the latter case, regardless of development. In the latter case, however, assistance may be required for the poorest regions to respond to serious climate threats in the globally "optimal" manner. Under intermediate assumptions about the severity of climate risks, development policy plays a greater role. In one scenario, which falls within the range of current debate, a high level of development assistance makes the difference between success and failure in long-term stabilization of the global climate.
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CRED v.1.4 Technical Report

SEI Technical Report

Author(s): Ackerman, F. ; Stanton, E.A. ; Bueno, R.
Year: 2012

Research Area(s): Climate Economics

Description: Climate and Regional Economics of Development (CRED) is an integrated assessment model with a central focus on the global distribution of climate damages and climate policy costs. It is designed to estimate the best pace of investment in emissions mitigation and the best distribution of the necessary investment costs among regions of the world, aiming to inform global climate negotiations and help break the stalemate between developed and developing countries. Version 1.4 of the CRED model was completed in August 2012. This technical report describes the CRED v.1.4 methodology in detail.
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Reason, Empathy, and Fair Play: the Climate Policy Gap

SEI Discussion Brief

Author(s): Stanton, E.A. ; Ackerman, F. ; Bueno, R.
Year: 2012

Research Area(s): Climate Economics

Description: To achieve the greatest possible human welfare, SEI's Climate and Regional Economics of Development (CRED) model calls for a rapid reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, beginning in the next decade and keeping cumulative twenty-first century carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions below 2,000 Gt (gigatonnes, or thousand million tons). This brief addresses why CRED recommends such stringent reductions when some other climate-economics models say that very slow emission reductions are the best policy.
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Reason, Empathy, and Fair Play: the Climate Policy Gap

SEI Working paper 2012-02

Author(s): Stanton, E.A. ; Ackerman, F. ; Bueno, R.
Year: 2012

Research Area(s): Climate Economics

Description: To achieve the greatest possible human welfare, SEI's Climate and Regional Economics of Development (CRED) model calls for a rapid reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, beginning in the next decade and keeping cumulative 21st century carbon dioxide emissions below 2,000 Gt. This report explains why CRED recommends such stringent reductions when some other climate-economics models say that very slow emission reductions are the best policy. The document includes a foreword by Jomo Kwame Sundaram, UN Assistant Secretary-General for Economic Development.
Note: A summary of this report has been published as a UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UN/DESA) policy brief. Download it here (external link to PDF, 293kb).
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Epstein-Zin utility in DICE: Is risk aversion irrelevant to climate policy?

E3 Network working paper

Author(s): Ackerman, F. ; Stanton, E.A. ; Bueno, R.
Year: 2012

Research Area(s): Climate Economics

Description: Climate change involves uncertain probabilities of catastrophic risks, and very long-term consequences of current actions. Climate economics, therefore, is centrally concerned with the treatment of risk and time. Yet conventional assumptions about utility and optimal economic growth create a perverse connection between risk aversion and time preference, such that more aversion to current risks implies less concern for future outcomes, and vice versa. This paper introduces an accessible implementation of Epstein-Zin utility into the DICE model of climate economics, creating a hybrid "EZ-DICE" model. Using Epstein-Zin parameters from the finance literature and climate uncertainty parameters from the science literature, the authors find that the optimal climate policy in EZ-DICE calls for rapid abatement of carbon emissions; it is similar to standard DICE results with the discount rate set to equal the risk-free rate of return.
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