Marion Davis

Communications Manager


Somerville, MA
marion.davis@sei-us.org
skype: marion.s.davis
+1 (617) 245-0895

Marion joined SEI-US in February 2010, initially to manage editing and communications for the Climate Economics Group, for which she worked until late 2011. She now handles communications institute-wide for SEI's Reducing Climate Risk theme – including editing, writing support, online materials, social media, outreach, media relations, and internal communications. She also manages communications for SEI-US, and she works closely with SEI headquarters on global communications.

Marion came to SEI with more than 15 years' experience in journalism and public relations, mostly focusing on domestic public-policy issues in the U.S. Born and raised in Costa Rica, she is fluent in Spanish and English and also speaks German and French. Marion has a B.A. in English and history from Georgetown University and an M.S. in print journalism from Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism.

For a complete list of her publications and on-going projects, including work not based in the U.S., see her page on the SEI International website.


Recent Publications by Marion Davis

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Evaluación de los impactos del cambio climático en la hidrología de montaña: Desarrollo de una metodología a través de un estudio de caso en los Andes del Perú

SEI Policy Brief

Author(s): Escobar, M. ; Davis, M.
Year: 2012

Research Area(s): Water Resources

Description: Este informe es una síntesis de un proyecto del Banco Mundial para desarrollar metodologías para la evaluación de los impactos del cambio climático sobre la hidrología superficial en los Andes peruanos. Se anticipa que el cambio climático acelerará la retirada de los glaciares tropicales en los Andes, afectará los patrones de precipitación, y aumentará la variabilidad del clima y fenómenos meteorológicos extremos. La metodología que se presenta aquí combina un análisis climático para definir los escenarios futuros del clima, un análisis de la hidrología de montaña para incorporar las dinámicas de los glaciares, y la aplicación de estos análisis al nivel de cuencas.
Note: This brief is a summary and translation of a World Bank report, available here.
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Building a Low-carbon Future: Resource Constraints and Key Strategies to Overcome Them

SEI / 3C summary for decision-makers

Author(s): Davis, M. ; based on work by M. Chadwick, V. Clark, E. Dawkins, R. Falk, J. Fahnestock, A. Fencl, S. Kartha, E. Kemp-Benedict, V. Mehta, D. Purkey, K. Roelich, A. Varnäs and D. Yates
Year: 2012

Research Area(s): Water Resources ; Energy Modeling ; Sustainable Futures

Description: This document summarizes the findings of three studies on resource scarcity and the green economy carried out within the partnership programme between the business leaders' initiative Combat Climate Change (3C) and the Stockholm Environment Institute. Building a 'green' economy – with a special focus on energy – is seen as a key strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and prevent dangerous climate change. For countries without vast fossil-fuel reserves, it is also a way to gain energy independence and security. Yet it is also becoming clear that resource constraints could hinder this endeavor. The studies summarized here examine potential constraints in the supplies of biomass, metals and water for low-carbon technologies, and suggest response strategies for both the public and private sectors.
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Water for Electricity: Resource Scarcity, Climate Change and Business in a Finite World

SEI Project Report

Author(s): Fencl, A. ; Clark, V. ; Mehta, V. ; Purkey, D. ; Davis, M. ; Yates, D.
Year: 2012

Research Area(s): Water Resources ; Energy Modeling ; Climate Mitigation Policy

Description: This report, based on research conducted as part of a partnership between the business leaders' initiative 3C (Combat Climate Change) and SEI, examines the potential impact of low-carbon electricity generation technologies on water resources – and how these water considerations might shape renewable-generation choices. The need to keep climate change within safe thresholds will require rapid emission reductions, and widespread deployment of low-carbon technologies to help achieve them. Yet some low-carbon energy sources require considerable amounts of water. Given competing demands, resource depletion and projected climate impacts, sufficient water may not always be available. The authors examine the water use implications of different electricity generation pathways, as well as potential ways to reduce the water use of electricity generation technologies, and they provide a case study of water and energy considerations in California, a renewable-energy leader.
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Real People, Real Impacts: The Climate Impact Equity Lens

SEI Report

Author(s): Stanton, E.A. ; Bueno, R. ; Davis, M.
Year: 2011

Research Area(s): Climate Economics

Description: The Climate Impact Equity Lens (CIEL) is a new tool for calculating net impacts from climate change in a way that highlights important differences in the distribution of costs and benefits. CIEL looks at climate impacts for real people instead of regional averages by comparing an individual's climate damages in a given year to her savings from not reducing emissions. Using CIEL can help us think about whether we are net winners (savings greater than costs) or net losers (costs greater than savings) today, and how that is likely to change over time. As policymakers negotiate the future of our climate, it is absolutely vital that they have in mind not just the potential impacts on a few "average" people, but the wide diversity of effects that will be felt by every person around the world. The policy report examines discusses this wide range of climate impacts, and includes a special case study on the Caribbean (also available in Spanish).

Note: This report is part of a package that also includes a
policy brief of the same title and The CIEL Backgrounder: Understanding the Climate Impact Equity Lens.
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External Link


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Real People, Real Impacts: The Climate Impact Equity Lens (Policy Brief)

SEI Policy Brief

Author(s): Stanton, E.A. ; Bueno, R. ; Davis, M.
Year: 2011

Research Area(s): Climate Economics

Description: The Climate Impact Equity Lens (CIEL) is a new tool for calculating net impacts from climate change in a way that highlights important differences in the distribution of costs and benefits. CIEL looks at climate impacts for real people instead of regional averages by comparing an individual's climate damages in a given year to her savings from not reducing emissions. This policy brief, which summarizes our report of the same title, shows how CIEL helps us think about whether we are net winners (savings greater than costs) or net losers (costs greater than savings) today, and how that is likely to change over time. As policymakers negotiate the future of our climate, it is absolutely vital that they have in mind not just the potential impacts on a few "average" people, but the wide diversity of effects that will be felt by every person around the world.
Note: This report is part of a package that also includes a report of the same title and The CIEL Backgrounder: Understanding the Climate Impact Equity Lens.
Download PDF
External Link