Stephanie Galaitsi

Staff Scientist


Somerville, MA
stephanie.galaitsi@sei-us.org
+1 (617) 627-3786 x7#

Stephanie is a researcher in the SEI-US Water Resources Group, focused on water systems modelling, particularly in the Middle East, and applications of the water-energy-food nexus framework.

Stephanie began working with SEI while researching domestic water demand in the West Bank for the Multi-Year Water Allocation Systems (MYWAS) optimization model for Israel, Jordan and the Palestinian territories as part of her master's thesis. She was hired as an intern in the summer of 2013, and became a research scientist in March 2014.

Stephanie has an M.S. in environmental and water resources engineering from Tufts University, and a B.A. in Middle East history from Carleton College. She has lived in Morocco, Yemen, Greece, and the West Bank and speaks French, Arabic, and modern Greek.


Recent Publications by Stephanie Galaitsi

Image

Water-energy nexus challenges & opportunities in the Arabian Peninsula under climate change

Poster presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, 12-16 December 2016

Author(s): Flores, F. ; Yates, D. ; Galaitsi, S. ; Binnington, T. ; Dougherty, B. ; Vinnaccia, M.; Glavan, J.C.
Year: 2016

Research Area(s): Water Resources

Description:

This conference poster presents the results of a study of the water-energy nexus in countries in the Arabian Peninsula, using a coupled WEAP-LEAP model. Demand for water in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries relies mainly on fossil groundwater resources and desalination. Satisfying water demand requires a great deal of energy, as it requires treating and moving water along the supply chain from sources, through treatment processes, and ultimately to the consumer. As part of the Abu Dhabi Global Environmental Data Initiative (AGEDI) Local, National, and Regional Climate Change Programme, a study of the water-energy nexus of the countries in the Arabian Peninsula was implemented. For water, WEAP models both water demand – and its main drivers – and water supply, simulating policies, priorities and preferences. For energy, LEAP models both energy supply and demand, and is able to capture the impacts of low-carbon development strategies. A coupled WEAP-LEAP model was then used to evaluate the future performance of the energy-water system under climate change and policy scenarios. The models examined five policy scenarios of different futures of resource management to the year 2060.


More information
External Link


Image

Exploring scientific information for policy making under deep uncertainty

Environmental Modelling & Software, 86, 232-247

Author(s): Forni, L. ; Galaitsi, S. ; Mehta, V. ; Escobar, M. ; Purkey, D. ; Depsky, N.; Lima, N.A.
Year: 2016

Research Area(s): Water Resources

Description: This paper describes the use of a Decision Space Visualization (DSV) that condenses model results to tackle complex water management challenges. It presents tools for discussing scientific results to decision-makers in two case studies, La Paz/El Alto, Bolivia, and Yuba County, California. Visualization output from the case studies combines spatiotemporal, multivariate and multirun/multiscenario information to produce information corresponding to the objectives and uncertainties described by key actors. These tools can manage complex data and distill scientific information into accessible formats.
More information
External Link


Image

Lesotho: Tackling water insecurity in a changing climate

SEI and World Bank policy brief

Author(s): Huber-Lee, A. ; Galaitsi, S. ; Davis, M. ; Wishart, M.; Emenanjo, I.
Year: 2016

Research Area(s): Water Resources ; Adaptation & Vulnerability

Description: This policy brief summarizes the findings of an assessment that evaluated the performance of Lesotho's water management system and explored adaptation strategies across a range of potential future climate conditions. It finds that future climate change is likely to have important implications for water security. All the climate models indicate that average mean surface temperatures will rise, but precipitation projections vary greatly. Ensuring the continued sustainable development of Lesotho's water resources requires an integrated and strategic long-term approach to water resources and climate change adaptation.
More information
Download PDF


Image

Lesotho Water Security and Climate Change Assessment

World Bank Group working paper

Author(s): Wishart, M. ; Huber-Lee, A. ; Joyce, B. ; Galaitsi, S. ; Emenanjo, I.; Liden, R.; Heumesser, C.; Engle, N.L.; Croneborg, L.; Yates, D.; et al.
Year: 2016

Research Area(s): Water Resources ; Climate Mitigation Policy

Description: This working paper presents the results of an assessment of Lesotho’s water resources management system that explored adaptation strategies across a range of potential future climate conditions.
More information
External Link


Image

Intermittent Domestic Water Supply: A Critical Review and Analysis of Causal-Consequential Pathways

Water 2016, 8(7), 274

Author(s): Galaitsi, S. ; Huber-Lee, A. ; Russell, R.; Bishara, A.; Durant, J.L.; Bogle, J.
Year: 2016

Research Area(s): Water Resources

Description:

This paper analyses the causes of intermittent domestic water supply, identifying 47 conditions that both lead to and develop from water intermittency, and the causal-consequential pathways between them. It proposes three categories of intermittency — predictable, irregular, and unreliable.


More information
External Link