Annette Huber-Lee

Senior Scientist


Somerville, MA
annette.huber-lee@sei-us.org
+1 (617) 300-0644

Annette Huber-Lee is a senior scientist who focuses on water resource management and policy. She returned to SEI-US in May after serving as director of SEI Asia, in Bangkok, from mid-2012 until February 2013. She has more than 20 years of professional experience in international and domestic planning and management of environmental and water resources.

Annette focuses on the integration of economic, engineering, and ecological approaches to solve environmental and social problems in a comprehensive and sustainable manner, as well as the development of innovative approaches to environmental policy and natural resource conflict management.

She has also served as a research assistant professor and lecturer in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Tufts University. From 2006 to 2008, she served as science leader and theme leader for the Challenge Program on Water and Food and the International Food Policy Research Institute in, Washington, DC. From 2001 to 2006, she directed the Water Program at SEI-US in Boston.

She has a Ph.D. in engineering sciences from Harvard University, an M.S. in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a B.S. in agricultural engineering from Cornell University.


Recent Publications by Annette Huber-Lee

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Lesotho: Tackling water insecurity in a changing climate

SEI and World Bank policy brief

Author(s): Huber-Lee, A. ; Galaitsi, S. ; Davis, M. ; Wishart, M.; Emenanjo, I.
Year: 2016

Research Area(s): Water Resources ; Adaptation & Vulnerability

Description: This policy brief summarizes the findings of an assessment that evaluated the performance of Lesotho's water management system and explored adaptation strategies across a range of potential future climate conditions. It finds that future climate change is likely to have important implications for water security. All the climate models indicate that average mean surface temperatures will rise, but precipitation projections vary greatly. Ensuring the continued sustainable development of Lesotho's water resources requires an integrated and strategic long-term approach to water resources and climate change adaptation.
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Lesotho Water Security and Climate Change Assessment

World Bank Group working paper

Author(s): Wishart, M. ; Huber-Lee, A. ; Joyce, B. ; Galaitsi, S. ; Emenanjo, I.; Liden, R.; Heumesser, C.; Engle, N.L.; Croneborg, L.; Yates, D.; et al.
Year: 2016

Research Area(s): Water Resources ; Climate Mitigation Policy

Description: This working paper presents the results of an assessment of Lesotho’s water resources management system that explored adaptation strategies across a range of potential future climate conditions.
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The Cost of Covering Costs: A Nationwide Model for Water Pricing

Water Economics and Policy, online 13 July 2016

Author(s): Reznik, A. ; Huber-Lee, A. ; Joyce, B. ; Feinerman, E.: Finkelshtain, I.; Kan, I.; Fisher, F.
Year: 2016

Research Area(s): Water Resources

Description:

This report finds optimal aggregated desalination in Israel is just 33% of the present capacity, suggesting construction of desalination facilities could have been delayed.


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Intermittent Domestic Water Supply: A Critical Review and Analysis of Causal-Consequential Pathways

Water 2016, 8(7), 274

Author(s): Galaitsi, S. ; Huber-Lee, A. ; Russell, R.; Bishara, A.; Durant, J.L.; Bogle, J.
Year: 2016

Research Area(s): Water Resources

Description:

This paper analyses the causes of intermittent domestic water supply, identifying 47 conditions that both lead to and develop from water intermittency, and the causal-consequential pathways between them. It proposes three categories of intermittency — predictable, irregular, and unreliable.


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Using water insecurity to predict domestic water demand in the Palestinian West Bank

Water International, 40(4), 614-634

Author(s): Galaitsi, S. ; Huber-Lee, A. ; Vogel, R.M.; Naumova, E.N.
Year: 2015

Research Area(s): Water Resources

Description: Household interviews were conducted in the Palestinian West Bank to examine the relationship between price elasticity, water insecurity and domestic water demand. Water insecurity weights were defined and quantified for each household for use in a multivariate regression model. The model demonstrated that (1) a water insecurity variable improves the ability to estimate price elasticity and that (2) increased water insecurity leads to higher levels of household water demand. The findings suggest that policy-makers can influence domestic water demand by addressing the supply constraints that underlie domestic water insecurity.
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