Taylor Binnington

Staff Scientist


Somerville, MA
taylor.binnington@sei-us.org
+1 (617) 627-3786 x8#

Taylor joined SEI-US in June 2013 and works on climate and energy modeling and analysis to inform policy in developing economies.

In addition to his role as a modeler, Taylor provides support and training to the worldwide community of Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning system (LEAP) users. His interests lie at the interfaces of development, technology, climate policy and grid integration of renewables.

Prior to joining SEI, he studied strategies for large-scale wind farm development in his home province of Ontario, Canada. He has an M.Sc. in geography (focused on environmental studies) from the University of Toronto, and an M.Sc. and a B.Sc. in theoretical physics from the University of Guelph.


Recent Publications by Taylor Binnington

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Water-energy nexus challenges & opportunities in the Arabian Peninsula under climate change

Poster presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, 12-16 December 2016

Author(s): Flores, F. ; Yates, D. ; Galaitsi, S. ; Binnington, T. ; Dougherty, B. ; Vinnaccia, M.; Glavan, J.C.
Year: 2016

Research Area(s): Water Resources

Description:

This conference poster presents the results of a study of the water-energy nexus in countries in the Arabian Peninsula, using a coupled WEAP-LEAP model. Demand for water in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries relies mainly on fossil groundwater resources and desalination. Satisfying water demand requires a great deal of energy, as it requires treating and moving water along the supply chain from sources, through treatment processes, and ultimately to the consumer. As part of the Abu Dhabi Global Environmental Data Initiative (AGEDI) Local, National, and Regional Climate Change Programme, a study of the water-energy nexus of the countries in the Arabian Peninsula was implemented. For water, WEAP models both water demand – and its main drivers – and water supply, simulating policies, priorities and preferences. For energy, LEAP models both energy supply and demand, and is able to capture the impacts of low-carbon development strategies. A coupled WEAP-LEAP model was then used to evaluate the future performance of the energy-water system under climate change and policy scenarios. The models examined five policy scenarios of different futures of resource management to the year 2060.


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Tackling complexity: Understanding the food-energy-environment nexus in Ethiopia's Lake Tana Sub-basin

Water Alternatives 2015, 8(1), 710-734

Author(s): Karlberg, L. ; Binnington, T. ; Flores, F. ; Young, C. ; Hoff, H.; Amsalu, T.; Andersson, K.; de Bruin, A.; Gebrehiwot, S.G.; Gedif, B.; zur Heide, .; Johnson, O.; Osbeck, M.
Year: 2015

Research Area(s): Water Resources ; Energy Modeling

Description: This article describes a nexus toolkit, including WEAP and LEAP, to evaluate different development trajectories for Ethiopia. Ethiopia is growing rapidly and is to become a middle-income country by 2025. To achieve this, the country is implementing an industrialization strategy led by agricultural development. It aims to intensify and transform agriculture, boost yields and economic returns. At the same time, energy use is shifting from traditional biomass to large-scale hydroelectric power generation with the intention of improving access to modern energy sources. While the targets are commendable, it is not clear that either all direct impacts or potential conflicts between goals have been considered. This paper evaluates and compares the impacts of alternative development trajectories pertaining to agriculture, energy and environment for a case-study location, the Lake Tana Subbasin.
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Applying the nexus – meeting Ethiopia's development goals by addressing links between water, energy and food

SEI policy brief

Author(s): Karlberg, L. ; Binnington, T. ; Flores, F. ; Young, C. ; Hoff, H.; Amsalu, T.; Andersson, K.; de Bruin, A.; Gebrehiwot, S.G.; Gedif, B.; zur Heide, F.; Johnson, O.; Osbeck M.
Year: 2015

Research Area(s): Water Resources ; Energy Modeling

Description: This policy brief reports on one of the first times that a nexus approach has been applied on the ground. SEI used its nexus toolkit – the WEAP and LEAP tools for water and energy planning – to assess the ambitious development plans of the Ethiopian Government in terms of their impact on food, energy and the environment. SEI worked with local planners, scientists and NGO staff from the agriculture, energy, water and environment sectors to develop three scenarios: business as usual, following the government's national growth plans, and a nexus approach. The work revealed that, by not taking sufficient account of the links between sectors and resources, the government's plans may not be sustainable or achievable without a toll on human well-being and ecosystems.
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