Nicholas Depsky

Research Analyst


Davis, CA
nicholas.depsky@sei-us.org
+1 (530) 753-3035

Nicholas Depsky is research analyst in the Water Group, focusing on regional water resource modelling and basin-level adaptive planning in the face of future uncertainties.

He started working at SEI in June 2013, after earning a B.S. in hydrologic sciences and environmental policy at the University of California–Davis. He has experience with climate change vulnerability analysis in municipal regions in Latin America and in watersheds in California, using WEAP, GIS and stakeholder engagement as the principal tools of research.

He also has a background in identifying effective climate-smart agricultural practices relevant for developing nations. Other previous research topics include river geomorphology, remote sensing, and assessing multi-actor compliance to California natural resource policy.

He was a visiting scholar to the University of Ghana, Legon from August to December 2012, where he studied environmental law, rural development, urban sanitation, as well as music. His favorite activities outside of the office are backpacking and playing the piano.


Recent Publications by Nicholas Depsky

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Vulnerability of Ecuador's Agricultural Sector as part of an Integrated Climate Change Vulnerability Study

ePoster GC13G-0757, American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, 15-19 December 2014

Author(s): Flores, F. ; Depsky, N.
Year: 2014

Research Area(s): Water Resources

Description: This study presents results of a vulnerability analysis for the Metropolitan District of Quito (DMQ). The study analyzed future anthropogenic and natural hazards, and how these threats may be potentially exacerbated by a changing climate over the next 40 years. The focus of this poster is specifically on the vulnerability of the agricultural sector. The results results show that it is expected that the increase in temperature will have a positive effect on the development of some crops, though the growing seasons would likely be shortened, which may be problematic given soil and rainfall constraints. Regarding expansion of agriculture into the "páramo" highlands, results showed that each 200 m zone above 3,400 masl would experience a marked increase in agricultural land conversion, ranging from 15 to 55km2, depending upon the zone.
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Vulnerability of the Metropolitan District of Quito's Water Resources in the face of Climatic and Anthropogenic Uncertainties

ePoster GC13G-0758, American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, 15-19 December 2014

Author(s): Depsky, N. ; Flores, F.
Year: 2014

Research Area(s): Water Resources

Description: This study presents results of a vulnerability analysis for the Metropolitan District of Quito (DMQ). Vulnerability assessments were done for five sectors in the region: water resources, public health, agriculture, ecosystems and forest fires. This poster focuses specifically on the vulnerability of the DMQ's water resources to climatic and anthropogenic uncertainties. This analysis focused on vulnerability of potable water supply for the city of Quito, as well as industrial and agricultural water needs. Current and future vulnerability was assessed in the face of a number of scenarios of climatic and non-climatic uncertainties. The assessment used an integrated water resources model developed by Quito's National Polytechnic University for the surrounding Guayllabamba river basin, using the Water Evaluation and Planning (WEAP) software.
More information
External Link