Lambert Schneider

SEI Associate


Berlin, Germany
lambertschneider@googlemail.com

Lambert Schneider has been an SEI Associate since 2013. He works as an independent consultant in the area of carbon markets, climate change and energy policy. He has worked intensively on the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) and issues related to monitoring, reporting, verification and accounting of greenhouse gas emissions.

Lambert studied energy, environmental and chemical engineering at the Technical University of Berlin. From 2000 to 2009 he worked with Öko-Institut, based in Berlin, on energy and climate policy. From 2001 to 2008 he was a member of the German delegation for the UN climate negotiations, working mainly on flexible mechanisms and reporting and review of GHG inventories. From 2005 to 2010 he was a member of the Methodologies Panel under the CDM Executive Board.

In 2010, he joined the Secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), leading a team working on the development and improvement of methodologies. Since 2012, he has been an independent consultant. In 2013, he became a member of the CDM Executive Board; as of 2014, he is vice-chair of the Board.


Recent Publications by Lambert Schneider

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Ensuring the environmental integrity of market mechanisms under the Paris Agreement

SEI policy brief

Author(s): Schneider, L. ; Kollmuss, A. ; La Hoz Theuer, S.
Year: 2016

Research Area(s): Emissions Trading & Offsets

Description: Market mechanisms that enable the international transfer of greenhouse gas emission permits or emission reduction credits have been part of the international climate regime for two decades. They aim to reduce the cost of achieving mitigation goals by providing flexibility in how and where emissions are reduced. This policy brief identifies key issues and explores options for safeguarding the environmental integrity of market mechanisms under the Paris Agreement, drawing on lessons from mechanisms established under the Kyoto Protocol.
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Market Mechanisms in the Paris Agreement – Differences and Commonalities with Kyoto Mechanisms

Discussion paper published by the German Emissions Trading Authority (DEHSt) at the German Environment Agency

Author(s): Schneider, L. ; Broekhoff, D.
Year: 2016

Research Area(s): Climate Mitigation Policy

Description:

This paper examines how the approaches to market mechanisms in Article 6 of the Paris Agreement compare with the approaches taken in the Kyoto Protocol.


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Robust Accounting of International Transfers under Article 6 of the Paris Agreement – Preliminary Findings

Discussion paper published by the German Emissions Trading Authority (DEHSt) at the German Environment Agency

Author(s): Schneider, L. ; Broekhoff, D. ; Cames, M.; Füssler, J.; La Hoz Theuer, S.
Year: 2016

Research Area(s): Climate Mitigation Policy

Description:

This discussion paper explores key issues and options to ensure robust accounting of international transfers from market mechanisms under Article 6 of the Paris Agreement.


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Categorization of INDCs in the light of Art. 6 of the Paris Agreement

Discussion paper published by the German Emissions Trading Authority (DEHSt) at the German Environment Agency

Author(s): Graichen, J. ; Schneider, L. ; Cames, M.
Year: 2016

Research Area(s): Climate Mitigation Policy

Description:

This paper evaluates INDCs submitted by October 2016 under the Paris Agreement, with a focus on features that are critical for robust accounting of international transfers under market mechanisms.


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Options and Issues for Restricted Linking of Emissions Trading Systems

Produced for the International Carbon Action Partnership (ICAP) Technical Dialogue on linking emissions trading systems

Author(s): Lazarus, M. ; Schneider, L. ; Lee, C.M. ; van Asselt, H.
Year: 2015

Research Area(s): Climate Mitigation Policy

Description: This paper examines options that jurisdictions could pursue to capture some of the benefits of linking emissions trading systems (ETSs), short of full linking. Linking ETSs offers many potential benefits, including economic benefits, political benefits, and administrative and institutional benefits. Linking may ultimately be necessary for an ETS to achieve its economic and political objectives, especially for smaller systems. As the limited number of existing links attests, however, linking faces many challenges. This paper thus examines alternatives to full linking, focusing in particular on the potential advantages and drawbacks of "restricted linking": options that enable the flow of units among jurisdictions, but with specific constraints such as quantity limits ("quotas"), or conditions such as exchange rates, to help address concerns that full harmonization might create.
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